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Herbal Formulas. Western Herbs from the TCM Perspective


Abbildung in Arbeit
Titel:Herbal Formulas. Western Herbs from the TCM Perspective
Autor:Ploberger Florian
Preis:Euro 79.00
Bestellnummer:35980

Portofreie Zusendung in Österreich und nach Deutschland!

Erschienen am 6. Februar 2019

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and thus also the Chinese phytotherapy is becoming more and more popular. Therefore so-called Western herbs are described and therapeutically applied according to TCM criteria.

This book describes about 150 herbs such as rosemary, ladys mantle, dandelion etc. Besides their English names, pharmaceutical, botanical and German names are also listed for each herb. In addition, a description of the parts of the plants used, their taste, temperature effect, the organs involved and doses is provided as well as detailed descriptions of the actions and individual fields of application of individual herbs.

A painting of each plant is also included in this book.

Furthermore, herbal formulas consisting of Western herbs are presented. They are structured by their effects in 20 groups (for example: herbal formula tonifying the Qi and the Blood; herbal formulas nourishing the Yin; herbal formulas tonifying the Yang; herbal formula promoting the Qi flow; herbal formulas stimulating the blood circulation; herbal formulas calming the mind; herbal formula calming Internal Wind; etc.) and are described as follows:

Individual herbs are listed with their respective daily dose in gram per day. This is followed by effect, indication and respective Western symptoms as well as tongue and pulse diagnoses in abbreviated form. The way the formula is compounded and the effects of the individual herbs used in the formula are explained for better understanding.

Your advantages:

Precise description of the effects of the individual 150 herbs
A painting of each plant
Herbal formulas by symptoms categorised in 20 groups
Detailed description how the herbal formula is compounded
This book serves as an important source of information both for beginners and for experienced therapists.
450 pages, many coloured pictures, hardback

Dear reader,

The interest in classical Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) herbal formulas has increased tremendously in recent decades. These herbal formulas are hundreds of years, some of them even 2000 to 3000 years old. Since many traditional works have survived to the present, TCM physicians have recourse to their ancestors comprehensive wealth of experience.

In this book we make a try at substituting classical TCM herbal formulas by formulas compounded of Western herbs. At this point I would like to state expressly that I hold the classical TCM works in high esteem. For this reason I consider the herbal formulas I describe to be merely suggestions. They should also serve as basis for discussion.

Classical TCM herbal formulas are characterised by their structure: Most herbal formulas comprise at lease three of the four main ingredients:

Chief herb (Jun)
Minister herb (Chen)
Messenger herb (Zuo)
Adjutant herb (Shi)

In this book chief herbs, minister herbs, adjutant herbs and messenger herbs are listed for all herbal formulas.

How can we explain the above mentioned terms?

In ancient China the emperor was sovereign and chief of the country and an important person. Similarly the chief herb has the principal healing action and is often prescribed in the highest dose of all herbs compounded. Traditionally Chinese herbal formulas are often named after the respective chief herb.

It was the task of the minister to serve the sovereign and chief. This explains the function of minister herbs: They promote the therapeutic action of the chief herb. In addition the minister herb has further healing effects for the patient, which are complementary to the actions of the chief herb. If we take a herbal formula which has been compounded to treat Qi Deficiency as an example, we will see that the chief herb is merely alleviating the Qi Deficiency. The minister herb could tonify Qi as well as blood.

Any undesirable side effects of a herbal formula are neutralised by the adjutant herb.

The so-called messenger herbs have a special purpose in compounding a TCM herbal formula. They define the energy direction of effects and the body region where the herbal formula should take effect (e.g. skin, lumbar part of the spine, temples, etc.). Furthermore, they harmonise the effects of the other herbs.

Of course, not all herbal formulas comprise these four ingredient categories. Usually they consist of chief and minister herbs, while adjutant and messenger herbs may be missing now and then. But including precisely such herbs is typical for TCM.

Unfortunately, in Western countries we do not have as much experience in applying our herbs like physicians in China, to whom ancient medical texts have been descended since 3000 years.

Yet, many arguments underline the approach to apply Western herbs according to TCM criteria:

Most of our herbs grow in the immediate vicinity of the user. Some of them we even find in our own gardens.
They are easily available and often less expensive than Chinese herbs.
They can be grown in a controlled way.
The legal approval is regulated.
After diagnosis consultation with the physician to gather the patients history as well as tongue diagnosis and pulse diagnosis they can be applied precisely according to TCM criteria.

Although we cannot have recourse to the same wealth of experience like TCM, we know about some experienced herbal specialists who lived in Western countries. As an example, I would like to mention the following few:

Hippocrates (5th century before christ)

Empedocles (5th century before christ)

Pedanius Dioscorides (1st century AD)

Pliny the Elder (23-79 AD)

Galen (2nd century AD)

Ar-Rhazi (869-925 AD)

Ibn Sina (also known as Avicenna, 980-1037 AD)

Hildegard of Bingen (12th century AD)

Otto Brunfels (16th century AD)

Hieronymus Bock (16th century AD)

Leonhard Fuchs (16th century AD)

Jakob Dieter (16th century AD)

Nicholas Culpepper (16th century AD)

Carl Linneus (1707-1778 AD)

Samuel Stearns (18th century AD)

Samuel Thomson (1769-1843 AD)

Fletcher Hyde (20th century AD)

John Christopher (20th century AD)

These scientists and physicians have left numerous texts to posterity, which are commonly used even today.

In this book about 50 herbal formulas are described. Herbs like rosemary, thyme, sage, burdock root, alder buckthorn bark, etc. are used in these herbal formulas. In addition herbs like cardamom, caraway, common fennel and anise are included, which are common kitchen spices in Europe.

The question whether TCM herbal formulas can be substituted by herbal formulas compounded of Western herbs can be answered as follows:

Many traditional Chinese herbal formulas can be excellently replaced by herbal formulas compounded of Western herbs. In particular many herbs can be found in Europe which are eminently suitable for draining Damp Heat.

It is more difficult to properly replace the group of tonifying TCM herbs by Western herbs.

Herbs tonifying blood as well as herbs tonifying Qi cannot be directly substituted by Western herbs. For example, there are no Western equivalents to Radix Angelicae sinensis (Danggui), Radix Ginseng (Renshen) or Radix Astragalus (Huangqi).

In this context the following facts are interesting: Especially bitter-cold herbs like centaury and gentian root were taken as tonifying herbs in European countries in the last centuries. These bitter-cold herbs are used for draining Damp Heat in TCM.

The following might explain why the above mentioned herbs could also be used as tonifying herbs: people had an excess of Damp Heat at that time. This was drained by applying bitter-cold herbs and, as a result, everybody who took these herbs felt better afterwards. Nevertheless: These herbs do not meet the TCM criteria of herbs tonifying Qi!

How this book is structured:

This book describes about 150 herbs such as rosemary, ladys mantle, dandelion etc. Besides their English names, pharmaceutical, botanical and German names are also listed for each herb. In addition, a description of the parts of the plants used, their taste, temperature effect, the organs involved and doses is provided as well as detailed descriptions of the actions and individual fields of application of individual herbs. A painting of each plant is also included in this book.

Furthermore, 50 herbal formulas consisting of Western herbs are presented in this book. They are structured by their effects in 20 groups and are described as follows:

Individual herbs are listed with their respective daily dose in gram per day. This is followed by effect, indication and respective Western symptoms as well as tongue and pulse diagnoses in abbreviated form. The way the formula is compounded and the effects of the individual herbs used in the formula are explained for better understanding.

The book is completed by an appendix, a comprehensive literature list and an index of keywords.

My sincere thanks go to Simon Becker MSc. for the accurate proofreading and revision of Chapter VIII.

I wish you much pleasure with our wonderful Western herbs.
With warm regards,

Florian Ploberger MD, B.Ac., MA
Vienna, in summer of the Earth Dog year 2018

VIII. Herbal formulas for TCM syndromes

In this section of the book you will find herbal formulas consisting of Western Herbs for various TCM syndromes. The herbal formulas are structured by their effects in 20 groups and are described as follows:

Individual herbs are listed with their respective daily dose in gram per day, followed by effect, indication and respective Western symptoms as well as tongue and pulse diagnoses in abbreviated form. The way the formula is compounded and the effects of the individual herbs used in the formula are explained for better understanding. Only one herbal formula is listed for some of the syndromes while in other syndromes up to four different herbal formulas are described in detail.

Herbal formula for external Wind Cold
Herbal formulas for external Wind Heat
Herbal formula that clears Heat in the Qi Level
Herbal formula that clears Heat from the organs
Herbal formulas that clear Heat and relieve Toxicity
Herbal formula that drains downward
Herbal formulas that have a harmonising effect.
Herbal formulas that promote urination and treat Dampness
Herbal formulas that treat Damp Heat
Herbal formula that dispels Wind Dampness
Herbal formulas that tonify the Qi
Herbal formulas that tonify the Blood
Herbal formula that tonifies the Qi and the Blood
Herbal formulas that nourish the Yin
Herbal formulas that tonify the Yang
Herbal formula that promotes the Qi flow
Herbal formulas that stimulate the blood circulation
Herbal formulas that calm the mind
Herbal formula that calm Internal Wind
Herbal formula that cures Food Stagnations

Author biography:

Florian Ploberger MD, B. Ac., MA

Vienna.

Born in the year of the Yin Water Ox 1973.

Main fields:
Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Tibetan Medicine.

Education:
Medical studies and internship in Vienna, study of acupuncture at the Austrian Society of Acupuncture and Auriculotherapy in 1996; three years of TCM studies with Claude Diolosa until 1998; Bachelor in Acupuncture from K. S. University in the USA 1999; four semesters of Sinology studies and 41 study and research visits (partly lasting several months) to China (TCM University in Beijing, TCM University in Chengdu), India (LTWA Library of Tibetan Works & Archives, Men-Tsee-Khang (Institute of Tibetan Medicine and Astrology of H.H. the XIVth Dalai Lama in Dharamsala, North India)) and Nepal. 2012 Master of Tibetology at the University of Vienna.

Medical practice in Vienna.

International teaching activity and numerous publications in the subject areas TCM (e.g. the book Westliche Kräuter aus Sicht der Traditionellen Chinesischen Medizin published in its 9th edition (also available in English language titled Western Herbs from the Traditional Chinese Medicine Perspective) and Tibetan Medicine. Numerous articles in German-language as well as English-language professional journals, peer reviewer for Asian Medicine (ASME).

Head of the Scientific Advisory Council of the Bacopa Educational Centre in Upper Austria and President of the ÖAGTCM (Austrian Educational Society for Traditional Chinese Medicine). Founding member of the AMATM (Austrian Medical Association for Tibetan Medicine). Member of SKI (Sorig Khang International) and IASTAM (International Association for the Study of Traditional Asian Medicine), Executive Committee Member of the WFCMS (World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies).
In 2016 he was appointed as one of the directors of the Alliance of Research and Development of Traditional Medicine, Complementary Medicine and Integrative Medicine by the Fudan University, Shanghai.

2007 invited by the Men-Tsee-Khang to lecture at their institute.
Since 2007 university lecturer on various subjects of Tibetan Medicine at the Institute of South Asian, Tibetan and Buddhist Studies (ISTB) of the University of Vienna. In the course of these activities he was able to invite renowned Tibetan physicians to give guest lectures at the university. For example Dr. Dawa, Dr. Namgyal Qusar, Dr. Tsultrim Kalsang, Dr. Teinlay P. Trogawa, and astrologist Dr. Tsering Choezom were guest lecturers.
In the summer semester 2010 teaching activity at the Institute of South and Central Asia of the Prague St. Charles University for one term, 2011 holding a guest lecture at the Institute of Eastern Asian Sciences of the University of Vienna / department of sinology, since 2012 annual guest lecture at the Medical University of Vienna in the context of the series of lectures on complementary medicine, 2014 four lectures on Western Herbs from the TCM Perspective on invitation of the Austrian Pharmacist Chamber as well as a lecture at the Institute of Social Anthropology of the Austrian Academy of the Sciences (ÖAW).

Additional lecturing activity at various international congresses, for example 2012 at the 12th ICOM Congress in Seoul/South Korea, 2014 at the 3rd International Congress on Traditional Tibetan Medicine in Kathmandu/Nepal as well as chairman of the meeting Acupunkture at the Menopause Congress in Vienna (organised by: University Clinic of Gynaecology), 2015 at the International Workshop on Tibetan Medical Formulas at the University of Westminster in London / British Academy, at the Establishing Meeting for the Tibetan Medicine Committee of the World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies & First Annual Conference on Tibetan Medicine in Xining, China, as well as at the 4th International Academic Conference on Comparison of Traditional and Modern Medicine in Yunnan, China. 2016 at the 14th Seminar of the International Association for Tibetan Studies in Bergen, Norway, as well as the 5th International Academic Conference on Comparison of Traditional and Modern Medicine in Xingyi, China. 2017 at the 5th International Congress on Sowa Rigpa in Kathmandu, as well as the 9th International Congress on Traditional Asian Medicines (ICTAM IX) in Kiel, Germany.

2009 officially commissioned by Dr. Dawa, the Men-Tsee-Khang director at the time, in consultation with the Health Department of the Tibetan exile government, to translate the first two parts of the most significant work of Tibetan Medicine (rgyud-bzhi) into the German language. This text, which meanwhile was published under the German title Wurzeltantra und Tantra der Erklärungen, has been serving as the basic text in the training of Tibetan medical practitioners since the 12th century, and is still being memorised today.
2011 commissioned by Dr. Tamdin, the Men-Tsee-Khang director at the time, to translate the subsequent part of the rgyud-bzhi (2015 published under the title Das letzte Tantra aus die vier Tantra der Tibetischen Medizin).

2017 commissioned by director Mr. Tashi Tsering Phuri to translate the first 27 chapters of the third part of this important text.

Award winner of the Lebensweise prize 2013 in the category Science and Medicine.

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